Veneer Cuts

RIFT SLICE

Commonly used for Red and White Oak, Rift cut can be easily sequenced and matched, by cutting a slight angle to the radial to arrive at a quartered appearance without excessive flake.

ROTARY

Similar to unrolling wrapping paper, this is the most economical method of producing veneer, resulting in the highest yield. This type of veneer is best suited for paint grade or utility surfaces.

PLAIN SLICE

The most common method of veneer manufacturing, used mainly in architectural plywood which produces a grain pattern known as cathedral. Ideally suited for wall panels, furniture and store fixtures.

QUARTER SLICE

Similar to the Plain Slice, this cut requires the largest diameter logs and produces straight grained veneers, often resulting in the appearance of flake.

HALF ROUND SLICE

Similar to Rotary Peeling, used primarily to add width to narrow stocks by increasing the place of the cut. Also used to enhance a particularly wild grain pattern. Matching is possible because the leaves can be kept in sequence. May also be used to achieve "Flat Slice" veneer appearance, primarily in Maple.